Lectures list

Scott Alexander-Bown




Scott is a Lead Android Developer and co-author of the Android Security Cookbook. Founder of SWmobile, a mobile developer focused meetup.com group with 650+ members. Creator of several open source Android security libraries. Enjoys running, Mexican food, Belgium beer and retro gaming.


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Lectures:

Android App Security on a Budget

Even with all the time & budget in the world you can't make a completely bulletproof app, so how do you stand a chance with a real world app? Real world apps have limited budget, are short on time and the task priorities are often decided by the security oblivious client/project managers. 

So what can we developers do to increase our app’s security and help protect our professional reputation? Where should we focus our app security effort? Isn’t security really difficult? and what gives us the biggest bang for our buck? 

We will answer these questions and show that improving your security need not be technically challenging or time consuming. Also I’ll illustrate that it doesn’t necessarily need buy-in from stakeholders. We’ll be using commercially viable open source libraries to level up your app’s network verification, tamper protection, device integrity checks and more! while keeping in mind a shoestring budget!

Many of the presented security protection techniques can be applied to iOS apps too, however the focus and examples will be Android.

Stage 1 21 April @ 15:00 - 16:00 Android App Security on a Budget

Android App Security on a Budget

Even with all the time & budget in the world you can't make a completely bulletproof app, so how do you stand a chance with a real world app? Real world apps have limited budget, are short on time and the task priorities are often decided by the security oblivious client/project managers. 

So what can we developers do to increase our app’s security and help protect our professional reputation? Where should we focus our app security effort? Isn’t security really difficult? and what gives us the biggest bang for our buck? 

We will answer these questions and show that improving your security need not be technically challenging or time consuming. Also I’ll illustrate that it doesn’t necessarily need buy-in from stakeholders. We’ll be using commercially viable open source libraries to level up your app’s network verification, tamper protection, device integrity checks and more! while keeping in mind a shoestring budget!

Many of the presented security protection techniques can be applied to iOS apps too, however the focus and examples will be Android.

Michał Bendowski

Google



Michał is Software Engineer on the Android Studio team in London. His main focus is improving the build system performance and the experience of writing and executing tests in Android Studio.


Lectures:

Android Studio Internals

I'll talk about how the Android Studio IDE interacts with our Gradle-based build system and how it could affect your build speeds. I'll cover some lesser known parts of the build system and give a high-level overview of the new Instant Run feature.

Stage 4 21 April @ 10:00 - 11:00 Android Studio Internals

Android Studio Internals

I'll talk about how the Android Studio IDE interacts with our Gradle-based build system and how it could affect your build speeds. I'll cover some lesser known parts of the build system and give a high-level overview of the new Instant Run feature.

Anne Cahalan

Detroit Labs



Anne Cahalan is an application developer at Detroit Labs, a mobile development shop in Detroit, Michigan. She makes apps with Xcode, sweaters with sticks, and cocktails with bourbon.


Lectures:

Truths Universally Acknowledged: Swift Design Patterns as Jane Austen Heroes

Have you ever looked at your code and realized that a certain design pattern was charging in like a romantic hero, sweeping away the confusion and bringing order to chaos? Or perhaps you've encountered a pattern that you utterly hated...until it's virtues slowly grew on you as you realized that the alternative was a complete disaster? Let's imagine Ada Lovelace reading Jane Austen, and compare some of my favorite design patterns with some of my favorite Jane Austen heroes.Note: I'll be showing Swift code, but neither knowledge of Swift nor Jane Austen are required.

Truths Universally Acknowledged: Swift Design Patterns as Jane Austen Heroes

Have you ever looked at your code and realized that a certain design pattern was charging in like a romantic hero, sweeping away the confusion and bringing order to chaos? Or perhaps you've encountered a pattern that you utterly hated...until it's virtues slowly grew on you as you realized that the alternative was a complete disaster? Let's imagine Ada Lovelace reading Jane Austen, and compare some of my favorite design patterns with some of my favorite Jane Austen heroes.Note: I'll be showing Swift code, but neither knowledge of Swift nor Jane Austen are required.

Adrian Catalan

Elemental Geeks



Adrián has been involved in software industry for 10+ years, working both in web and mobile apps. GDG Guatemala, GuatemalaJS and Nodebots co-organizer. Currently he leads the Innovation Lab at Galileo University and is a Google Developer Expert(GDE) for Android, IoT and Firebase.


Lectures:

Android App Architecture for the Everyday Developer

MVC, MVP, MVVM, Clean and more keywords might sound familiar to you, these describes patterns that helps developers building high quality software by organizing things up. But why bother? why not stick to the classic 'don't fix what ain't broken'? A well planified architected app can speed up the development process and simplify the long term maintainability. It's not enough to keep functions smalls and not building a god-Activity, we need to level-up and design towards clean architecture. This talk will review and discuss MVP and Clean approaches, how to start, and tips on architecting our apps in a compelling way.

Stage 2 21 April @ 11:00 - 12:00 Android App Architecture for the Everyday Developer

Android App Architecture for the Everyday Developer

MVC, MVP, MVVM, Clean and more keywords might sound familiar to you, these describes patterns that helps developers building high quality software by organizing things up. But why bother? why not stick to the classic 'don't fix what ain't broken'? A well planified architected app can speed up the development process and simplify the long term maintainability. It's not enough to keep functions smalls and not building a god-Activity, we need to level-up and design towards clean architecture. This talk will review and discuss MVP and Clean approaches, how to start, and tips on architecting our apps in a compelling way.

Karolina Cikowska

Girls Code Fun



Raised in NYC, Karolina returned to Poland six years ago. Graduated with a Master's in Psychology from Union College and SWPS. A proud mother of five year-old Kaya, and three year-old Felix.  

In 2015 she founded Girls Code Fun, an organization which aims to invest in, encourage, and empower more school-aged children, with an emphasis on girls, in Poland to gain an interest in technology and to pursue an education in computer science. Karolina is also the co-founder of Kids Code Fun, a programming school for children and adults.


Lectures:

Why Your Kid Won’t Be a Programmer?

They say that all kids should learn how to code and that technology is the key to the future. As founders of a programming school for children, we'll tell you why your child won't become a programmer and why technology isn't a necessary key to the future.

Stage 3 21 April @ 16:00 - 17:00 Why Your Kid Won’t Be a Programmer?

Why Your Kid Won’t Be a Programmer?

They say that all kids should learn how to code and that technology is the key to the future. As founders of a programming school for children, we'll tell you why your child won't become a programmer and why technology isn't a necessary key to the future.

Van Anh Dam

Girls Code Fun



As a teacher she's managed to combine her three biggest passions: teaching kids, creativity and technology. A co-founder of Kids Code Fun - a programming school for kids and teens. If a programmer were to be called a poet, Van Anh teaches future poets the alphabet.


Lectures:

Why Your Kid Won’t Be a Programmer?

They say that all kids should learn how to code and that technology is the key to the future. As founders of a programming school for children, we'll tell you why your child won't become a programmer and why technology isn't a necessary key to the future.

Stage 3 21 April @ 16:00 - 17:00 Why Your Kid Won’t Be a Programmer?

Why Your Kid Won’t Be a Programmer?

They say that all kids should learn how to code and that technology is the key to the future. As founders of a programming school for children, we'll tell you why your child won't become a programmer and why technology isn't a necessary key to the future.

Francisco Franco






Francisco Franco is an Android developer with six years of experience building applications and custom kernels for Nexus devices, focusing on improving battery life and improving feature extensibility on the platform.

Francisco has built several apps and services, the most popular being FKUpdater which serves as an interface for managing his custom kernels and offers an easy way for users to stay up to date. Francisco also built Focus, an innovative photo/video gallery replacement that showcases material design at its best. He also has experience with startups in Silicon Valley, contributing to the project that began what is now known as Android Auto.

He spends his free time finding new challenges to tackle, the latest being an exploration into mutative design with Liam Spradlin.


Lectures:

The Living Interface: Mutative Design

Mutative design is a theoretical design methodology that would allow interfaces and experiences to be born, live, and evolve according to a user’s realities.

With mutative design, things like physical ability, lighting, and vision are accounted for automatically, allowing interfaces to be engaging and accessible to every user, without compromise.

In this session we’ll give a brief overview of the rationale and process behind mutative design and take a look at the first mutative sample app - Selene. We’ll walk through Selene’s first mutations from design and development perspectives, and explore what’s next for mutative design.

Stage 4 21 April @ 12:00 - 13:00 The Living Interface: Mutative Design

The Living Interface: Mutative Design

Mutative design is a theoretical design methodology that would allow interfaces and experiences to be born, live, and evolve according to a user’s realities.

With mutative design, things like physical ability, lighting, and vision are accounted for automatically, allowing interfaces to be engaging and accessible to every user, without compromise.

In this session we’ll give a brief overview of the rationale and process behind mutative design and take a look at the first mutative sample app - Selene. We’ll walk through Selene’s first mutations from design and development perspectives, and explore what’s next for mutative design.

Kyle Fuller




Kyle Fuller started developing Swift the very day it was announced and he hasn’t looked back since. He’s an active contributor in the open-source Swift scene with more projects than he can count.


Lectures:

End-to-end: Building a Web Service in Swift

With open source Swift, Apple has created a new range of possibilities. You can now take existing knowledge and code and apply then to web application development.
 
This talk will show you how you can reuse existing skills to build and deploy your first web service in Swift.

Stage 2 22 April @ 10:00 - 11:00 End-to-end: Building a Web Service in Swift

End-to-end: Building a Web Service in Swift

With open source Swift, Apple has created a new range of possibilities. You can now take existing knowledge and code and apply then to web application development.
 
This talk will show you how you can reuse existing skills to build and deploy your first web service in Swift.

Ash Furrow

Artsy



Ash Furrow is a Canadian iOS developer and author, currently working at Artsy. He has published four books, built many apps, and is a contributor to the open source community. On his blog, he writes about a range of topics, from interesting programming to explorations of analogue film photography.


Lectures:

iOS Checkup

Ash Furrow will assess the current health of the iOS developer community and prescribe any necessary remedies. Come hear him discuss a variety of topics, from continuous integration to community management. Eat your vegetables!

Stage 1 21 April @ 10:00 - 11:00 iOS Checkup

iOS Checkup

Ash Furrow will assess the current health of the iOS developer community and prescribe any necessary remedies. Come hear him discuss a variety of topics, from continuous integration to community management. Eat your vegetables!

Richa Khandelwal

Coursera



Richa has 3+ years of experience working with Android. She experienced smartphone development up close and personal at Amazon while working on Voice Assistant for Fire Phone and is now working at Coursera to enable people across the globe to take world's best online courses for free.


Lectures:

Clean Android Architecture

Most engineers start working on apps as prototypes with less focus on architecture and more focus on functionality until the point when the app's architecture or lack thereof becomes an impediment in continuing to build features into the app at a fast pace. This talk will cover experiences with Coursera's Android app, build up on issues with MVC and go on to illustrate how to start with MVC and get to a solution that fits the needs of apps.

Clean Architecture is a great way to start thinking about architecture for apps. Using SOLID principles, its a philosophy that motivates developers to think of architecture in terms of intents rather than frameworks and build software that are independent of UI, database or libraries. UI changes much faster than databases, and its important to decouple former from latter to make changes to it easily without affecting the latter, which is what this philosophy motivates. The talk will go through a way of implementing clean architecture using a modified version VIPER, and into implementation details using a sample application.

Stage 3 22 April @ 16:00 - 17:00 Clean Android Architecture

Clean Android Architecture

Most engineers start working on apps as prototypes with less focus on architecture and more focus on functionality until the point when the app's architecture or lack thereof becomes an impediment in continuing to build features into the app at a fast pace. This talk will cover experiences with Coursera's Android app, build up on issues with MVC and go on to illustrate how to start with MVC and get to a solution that fits the needs of apps.

Clean Architecture is a great way to start thinking about architecture for apps. Using SOLID principles, its a philosophy that motivates developers to think of architecture in terms of intents rather than frameworks and build software that are independent of UI, database or libraries. UI changes much faster than databases, and its important to decouple former from latter to make changes to it easily without affecting the latter, which is what this philosophy motivates. The talk will go through a way of implementing clean architecture using a modified version VIPER, and into implementation details using a sample application.

Gregory Kick

Google



Gregory Kick is a Staff Software Engineer at Google where he is currently the tech lead for Dagger 2: a compile-time dependency injection framework for Java and Android. Previous projects include Guava, Caliper, Google Takeout and Feedburner. He has also contributed to projects ranging from Android applications to web search. Prior to Google he worked as a consultant at Accenture where he built custom Java solutions and contributed to the Spring Framework.


Lectures:

Dagger 2

This presentation is an update on Dagger 2.  First, we'll give updates on our improvements to the implementation and the features that have been added since our original release.  Then we'll discuss some of our plans for some new features and APIs that are coming in the next few months that should make dependency injection in Android applications easier and more straightforward than ever before.

Stage 4 22 April @ 12:00 - 13:00 Dagger 2

Dagger 2

This presentation is an update on Dagger 2.  First, we'll give updates on our improvements to the implementation and the features that have been added since our original release.  Then we'll discuss some of our plans for some new features and APIs that are coming in the next few months that should make dependency injection in Android applications easier and more straightforward than ever before.

Lasse Koskela

Reaktor Ventures



Lasse Koskela is an experienced technology and a methodology consultant. He has consulted and trained some of the largest organisations in the Nordics and worldwide in their adoption of agile software development, including Nokia, F-Secure, Nordea and HBO. Alongside his work in methodology consulting, Lasse works hands-on with mobile technologies. During just the past two years he has shipped several iOS, Android and even Windows Phone apps for leading consumer brands. Lasse has also written two internationally published books through Manning Publications and has presented his thinking to thousands of fellow professionals in international conferences as well as closed gatherings from small businesses to large entities such as the European Commission.


Lectures:

Full-Text Search on iOS and Android

"Search" is one of those things that our users take for granted but is surprisingly difficult to get right. In this talk we'll dig into the essential concepts in implementing a proper full-text search, highlighting the challenges such as sorting by relevancy, term and column boosting, stemming and lemmatisation, and the brutality of compound words. We'll look at implementing full-text search with an embedded search engine as well as with the true workhorse of both iOS and Android developers alike – SQLite and its FTS tables.

Stage 1 22 April @ 15:00 - 16:00 Full-Text Search on iOS and Android

Full-Text Search on iOS and Android

"Search" is one of those things that our users take for granted but is surprisingly difficult to get right. In this talk we'll dig into the essential concepts in implementing a proper full-text search, highlighting the challenges such as sorting by relevancy, term and column boosting, stemming and lemmatisation, and the brutality of compound words. We'll look at implementing full-text search with an embedded search engine as well as with the true workhorse of both iOS and Android developers alike – SQLite and its FTS tables.

Felix Krause

Fastlane



Felix Krause worked on various startups as an iOS developer before he started working on fastlane as a side project. Since early 2015 he has worked full-time on fastlane and recently joined Twitter in San Francisco.


Lectures:

Continuous Delivery for Mobile Apps Using Fastlane

Talking about code signing, generating screenshots and automating your mobile deployment pipeline

Stage 4 21 April @ 15:00 - 16:00 Continuous Delivery for Mobile Apps Using Fastlane

Continuous Delivery for Mobile Apps Using Fastlane

Talking about code signing, generating screenshots and automating your mobile deployment pipeline

Eugenio Marletti

Clue



Stuck in a love/hate relationship with the green droid. Made in Italy, grown on the Web, currently proud Berliner.
Lead Android Engineer @Clue


Lectures:

Life Without Fragments

What is wrong with Fragments as they are implemented right now? You hear a lot of rage around bugs, issues, and plain bad/obscure APIs. But what alternatives are out there?
Most of the time, Fragments are used as custom Views. But that’s overkill for Fragments, and it’s not what they’re meant for, either: they can do way more than that (and probably shouldn’t). The talk will run through the architectural choices that we found out helped us create great apps without getting lost in Fragment hell. Because #fragmentsmatter, but not more than… [dramatic music mounts to climax, screen fades to black. ""TO BE CONTINUED"" appears on screen]

Stage 1 21 April @ 17:00 - 18:00 Life Without Fragments

Life Without Fragments

What is wrong with Fragments as they are implemented right now? You hear a lot of rage around bugs, issues, and plain bad/obscure APIs. But what alternatives are out there?
Most of the time, Fragments are used as custom Views. But that’s overkill for Fragments, and it’s not what they’re meant for, either: they can do way more than that (and probably shouldn’t). The talk will run through the architectural choices that we found out helped us create great apps without getting lost in Fragment hell. Because #fragmentsmatter, but not more than… [dramatic music mounts to climax, screen fades to black. ""TO BE CONTINUED"" appears on screen]

Natasha Murashev




Natasha is an iOS developer by day and a robot by night. She blogs about Swift, WatchOS, and iOS development on her blog, natashatherobot.com, curates a fast-growing weekly Swift newsletter: http://swiftnews.curated.co/, and runs a Swift Job board: http://natashatherobot.com/swift-jobs. Twitter: https://twitter.com/natashatherobot.


Lectures:

Practical Protocol-Oriented Programming in Swift

Value types are at the core of Swift (seriously, mostly everything in the Swift standard library is a value type). But how do you avoid subclassing? That's where the power of Protocol-Oriented programming comes in. Learn how to structure your code to (almost) never subclass again! Practical everyday examples and ideas for your own code base will be included.

Stage 1 21 April @ 12:00 - 13:00 Practical Protocol-Oriented Programming in Swift

Practical Protocol-Oriented Programming in Swift

Value types are at the core of Swift (seriously, mostly everything in the Swift standard library is a value type). But how do you avoid subclassing? That's where the power of Protocol-Oriented programming comes in. Learn how to structure your code to (almost) never subclass again! Practical everyday examples and ideas for your own code base will be included.

Jorge D. Ortiz-Fuentes




Jorge is a freelance dedicated to mobile development, security, and systems architecture. As a developer he started to work for the M.I.T. in 1993 and since he has collaborated in many software projects. Most of them were internally for HP where he worked for more than 15 years. Since 2008 he has been working in different aspects of mobile development. After playing with PalmOS, he learned Android programming for the first Google App contest and immediately started to play with the first iPhone SDK. He often participates as instructor in the best iOS and Android Bootcamps in U.S.A. and Europe. He has recently founded Canonical Examples to help other developers to take a step forward and become senior developers in a very demanding market


Lectures:

Escape from Mars: Thank Your Architecture

Everybody involved in a mid size project or bigger is concerned about architecture.  We have all been told that a good architecture can help us to have a more agile, robust, and easier to work with application, but it is not always clear how nor the architecture everybody else is talking about.  By establishing parallelisms with Andy Weir's story, The Martian, I will go through the most relevant problems we usually find, explain how a well though out architecture can be valuable to us, and share some code that implements it.
I will use Swift in all of the code examples, because, in my opinion, it is very well suited to implement those advanced architectures. I will highlight its advantages and disadvantages compared Objective-C and other languages from an architectural point of view.
If you care:- The talk includes only minor spoilers- No, it isn't about MVC, but beyond that

Stage 4 21 April @ 17:00 - 18:00 Escape from Mars: Thank Your Architecture

Escape from Mars: Thank Your Architecture

Everybody involved in a mid size project or bigger is concerned about architecture.  We have all been told that a good architecture can help us to have a more agile, robust, and easier to work with application, but it is not always clear how nor the architecture everybody else is talking about.  By establishing parallelisms with Andy Weir's story, The Martian, I will go through the most relevant problems we usually find, explain how a well though out architecture can be valuable to us, and share some code that implements it.
I will use Swift in all of the code examples, because, in my opinion, it is very well suited to implement those advanced architectures. I will highlight its advantages and disadvantages compared Objective-C and other languages from an architectural point of view.
If you care:- The talk includes only minor spoilers- No, it isn't about MVC, but beyond that

Sebastiano Poggi

Novoda



Emerging from the foggy plains of northern Italy, where he left his job at a wearables startup, Sebastiano moved to London aiming to put his curls at the service of great Android apps. Regularly speaking at conferences and blogging got him into the Google Developer Expert programme in 2014. Now he spends his time obsessing over UI and UX details while coding some rather cool apps at Novoda.


Lectures:

Life Without Fragments

What is wrong with Fragments as they are implemented right now? You hear a lot of rage around bugs, issues, and plain bad/obscure APIs. But what alternatives are out there?
Most of the time, Fragments are used as custom Views. But that’s overkill for Fragments, and it’s not what they’re meant for, either: they can do way more than that (and probably shouldn’t). The talk will run through the architectural choices that we found out helped us create great apps without getting lost in Fragment hell. Because #fragmentsmatter, but not more than… [dramatic music mounts to climax, screen fades to black. ""TO BE CONTINUED"" appears on screen]

Stage 1 21 April @ 17:00 - 18:00 Life Without Fragments

Life Without Fragments

What is wrong with Fragments as they are implemented right now? You hear a lot of rage around bugs, issues, and plain bad/obscure APIs. But what alternatives are out there?
Most of the time, Fragments are used as custom Views. But that’s overkill for Fragments, and it’s not what they’re meant for, either: they can do way more than that (and probably shouldn’t). The talk will run through the architectural choices that we found out helped us create great apps without getting lost in Fragment hell. Because #fragmentsmatter, but not more than… [dramatic music mounts to climax, screen fades to black. ""TO BE CONTINUED"" appears on screen]

Konstantin Raev

Facebook



Konstantin is a Web Developer at Facebook who is lucky to work at React Native Open Source team. For the last few years his passions were infrastructure, Continuous Delivery, JavaScript and stable builds. Before joining Facebook he worked at a New Zealand startup www.booktrack.com.


Lectures:

React Native: Open Source Continuous Build and Delivery

React Native was open sourced by Facebook a year ago.
Since then it had a massive success with the community and keeping the code stable ensures that we can steadily grow the platform.
In this talk I will share what tools React Native team uses to prevent code from breaking, automate deployment and speed up development: Open Source CI systems, BUCK (buckbuild.com) - build system that we use for our large Facebook codebase and GitHub bots.

React Native: Open Source Continuous Build and Delivery

React Native was open sourced by Facebook a year ago.
Since then it had a massive success with the community and keeping the code stable ensures that we can steadily grow the platform.
In this talk I will share what tools React Native team uses to prevent code from breaking, automate deployment and speed up development: Open Source CI systems, BUCK (buckbuild.com) - build system that we use for our large Facebook codebase and GitHub bots.

Jon Reid

Skype



Jon Reid is committed to Clean Code and has been practicing Test Driven Development since 2001. He is the author of OCHamcrest and OCMockito. Jon blogs at http://qualitycoding.org.


Lectures:

Software Paradigms & Patterns — Did We Get It All Wrong?

Are we coding out of learned helplessness? Let's use Model-View-Controller as our starting point to look at ways we approach common problems. If there's a problem, how do we discover the way out?
http://qualitycoding.org/mce3/

Software Paradigms & Patterns — Did We Get It All Wrong?

Are we coding out of learned helplessness? Let's use Model-View-Controller as our starting point to look at ways we approach common problems. If there's a problem, how do we discover the way out?
http://qualitycoding.org/mce3/

Dariusz Seweryn

Polidea



Dariusz is a Senior Software Engineer at Polidea with background of Electronics and Computer Engineering. He worked on Bluetooth Low Energy applications for a few years now. Technology and science passionate. DIY electronics fan. A sailor


Lectures:

Demystifying Android's Bluetooth Low Energy

Programming with a hardware in mind is fun. IoT is no longer a future but it's around us and Bluetooth programming became our reality. We'll tell you how to play with it without having a headache, using reactive concepts.

Stage 4 22 April @ 11:00 - 12:00 Demystifying Android's Bluetooth Low Energy

Demystifying Android's Bluetooth Low Energy

Programming with a hardware in mind is fun. IoT is no longer a future but it's around us and Bluetooth programming became our reality. We'll tell you how to play with it without having a headache, using reactive concepts.

Liam Spradlin

Touchlab



Liam Spradlin is a UIUX designer working primarily on Android. He’s the lead designer at touchlab, and a Google Expert in UIUX.
Liam has worked with clients including GE Appliance, the National MS Society, and the independent developers of apps like Nova Launcher, AllCast, Today Calendar, and Focus.
At touchlab, Liam helps partners craft Android experiences with great design as a foundational principle, whether the product is Android-first or expanding from other platforms.
Whether it’s type design, interface, or illustration, Liam spends a lot of his free time continuing to explore design. Outside of that, you can find him behind a camera or writing blog posts.


Lectures:

The Living Interface: Mutative Design

Mutative design is a theoretical design methodology that would allow interfaces and experiences to be born, live, and evolve according to a user’s realities.

With mutative design, things like physical ability, lighting, and vision are accounted for automatically, allowing interfaces to be engaging and accessible to every user, without compromise.

In this session we’ll give a brief overview of the rationale and process behind mutative design and take a look at the first mutative sample app - Selene. We’ll walk through Selene’s first mutations from design and development perspectives, and explore what’s next for mutative design.

Stage 4 21 April @ 12:00 - 13:00 The Living Interface: Mutative Design

The Living Interface: Mutative Design

Mutative design is a theoretical design methodology that would allow interfaces and experiences to be born, live, and evolve according to a user’s realities.

With mutative design, things like physical ability, lighting, and vision are accounted for automatically, allowing interfaces to be engaging and accessible to every user, without compromise.

In this session we’ll give a brief overview of the rationale and process behind mutative design and take a look at the first mutative sample app - Selene. We’ll walk through Selene’s first mutations from design and development perspectives, and explore what’s next for mutative design.

Marin Todorov

Realm



Marin Todorov is an independent iOS consultant and publisher. He’s the author of the iOS Animations by Tutorials” book and runs the “iOS Animations by Emails” newsletter. He started developing on an Apple ][ more than 20 years ago and keeps rocking till today. Meanwhile he has worked in great companies like Monster Technologies and Native Instruments, has lived in 4 different countries, and is one the founding members of the raywenderlich.com tutorial team. Besides crafting code, Marin also enjoys blogging, writing books, teaching, and speaking. He sometimes open sources his code. He walked the way to Santiago.


Lectures:

Building Swift Libraries for iOS

I'll look into the internals of a Swift library developed for iOS that heavily uses UIKit and the ObjectiveC runtime. Since those are two dependencies you can't get rid off why not make the best out of them? I'm going to look into how I could stand of the shoulders of giants to deliver a slim but flexible Swift lib with the ObjectiveC runtime blessing.

Stage 3 22 April @ 11:00 - 12:00 Building Swift Libraries for iOS

Building Swift Libraries for iOS

I'll look into the internals of a Swift library developed for iOS that heavily uses UIKit and the ObjectiveC runtime. Since those are two dependencies you can't get rid off why not make the best out of them? I'm going to look into how I could stand of the shoulders of giants to deliver a slim but flexible Swift lib with the ObjectiveC runtime blessing.

Paweł Urban

Polidea



Paweł Urban is a full cycle Android developer, with strong belief in product quality. Fan of usability and agile methodologies. In the past connected with mobile payments and e-commerce in PayU/Allegro. Currently working on shipping top notch products to Polidea's customers as a Senior Software Engineer.


Lectures:

Demystifying Android's Bluetooth Low Energy

Programming with a hardware in mind is fun. IoT is no longer a future but it's around us and Bluetooth programming became our reality. We'll tell you how to play with it without having a headache, using reactive concepts.

Stage 4 22 April @ 11:00 - 12:00 Demystifying Android's Bluetooth Low Energy

Demystifying Android's Bluetooth Low Energy

Programming with a hardware in mind is fun. IoT is no longer a future but it's around us and Bluetooth programming became our reality. We'll tell you how to play with it without having a headache, using reactive concepts.

Ágnes Vásárhelyi

Bitrise



Agnes is a developer and spaceship advocate at Bitrise.  She is in love with coding since she was a kid and started her career as iOS developer. Now she's all about automation and open source, writing her tech blog and organizing NSBudapest.


Lectures:

ReactiveCocoa Reloaded

ReactiveCocoa is the first and most commonly used implementation of the reactive paradigms in Cocoa, with a lot of bindings to UIKit/AppKit frameworks to help connecting reactive signals to UI elements. I was lucky to work on a huge Objective-C codebase with heavy use of ReactiveCocoa prepared to be released for millions of users, so I have some pros and cons in my pocket even for that scale. I'd like to discuss the state of ReactiveCocoa in 2016, to help people to understand their possibilities especially if they are in the phase of moving to Swift. I'd like to share the main differences of the new ReactiveCocoa Swift API with code snippets. What are the conceptual changes, in comparison to the v2 Objective-C API. Some examples of other libs, like RxSwift and what are the main differences in usage.

Stage 4 21 April @ 11:00 - 12:00 ReactiveCocoa Reloaded

ReactiveCocoa Reloaded

ReactiveCocoa is the first and most commonly used implementation of the reactive paradigms in Cocoa, with a lot of bindings to UIKit/AppKit frameworks to help connecting reactive signals to UI elements. I was lucky to work on a huge Objective-C codebase with heavy use of ReactiveCocoa prepared to be released for millions of users, so I have some pros and cons in my pocket even for that scale. I'd like to discuss the state of ReactiveCocoa in 2016, to help people to understand their possibilities especially if they are in the phase of moving to Swift. I'd like to share the main differences of the new ReactiveCocoa Swift API with code snippets. What are the conceptual changes, in comparison to the v2 Objective-C API. Some examples of other libs, like RxSwift and what are the main differences in usage.

Hannes Verlinde

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Hannes fell in love with the Mac when his parents bought a Performa back in the early 90s, and has been hacking ever since. He’s worked for software companies active in packaging, marketing, and mobile. Currently he lives in London, where he helps connect the world as an iOS engineer at Facebook. When off duty, he enjoys running and entertaining his two children.


Lectures:

Let the Symbols Do the Work

Syntactic symbol manipulation may be the universal way of deriving new knowledge in science and engineering, but the technique is still rarely used in the act of writing software. We will explore this alternate way of reasoning about code, while demonstrating the power of formal refactoring and its potential for automation.

Stage 1 21 April @ 16:00 - 17:00 Let the Symbols Do the Work

Let the Symbols Do the Work

Syntactic symbol manipulation may be the universal way of deriving new knowledge in science and engineering, but the technique is still rarely used in the act of writing software. We will explore this alternate way of reasoning about code, while demonstrating the power of formal refactoring and its potential for automation.



Kinoteka, Warsaw
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